Robot Sneakadoodle tutorial

Posted by Elizabeth Mackinney on

2016-08-02FP-PurpleRobotStepFinalB-W

While many designs are requested particularly by one gender or another, it’s also important to have plenty of gender neutral designs available which appeal to all kids and adults, because you never know what they’re going to request during an event. This Sneakadoodle robot works for both boys and girls, and although I chose a simple triad (purple, green, and orange), the colors can be altered to fit any child’s favorites.

Materials

Paradise purple
Paradise lime green
Paradise red
TAG orange
TAG yellow
Diamond FX black
Diamond FX white
#2 round brush
#5 round brush
1/2-inch flat or filbert brush
Sponge
Cosmetic glitter (optional)

Tutorial

Using your 1/2-inch flat brush or filbert, begin by painting the shapes of your robot’s eyes right in the middle of the forehead at approximately a 45 degree angle with yellow. Make the mouth below it, and then create the purple shape around the facial features.

2016-08-02FP-PurpleRobotStep01

Sponge the rest of the forehead area with Paradise lime green, and when this has dried sufficiently, paint the robot claws over the top with your flat or filbert brush. If you decide to add glitter, use your poofer now before the paint dries completely so it sticks to the design.

Create the antennae with the round brush and a combination of TAG orange.

2016-08-02FP-PurpleRobotStep01B

Create two red eyes in the yellow area with your #5 round brush.

2016-08-02FP-PurpleRobotStep01C

Using a liner brush or your #2 round brush, outline your robot shapes being careful to stay up on the tip of your brush. A liner has longer bristles, so it will hold more paint for this purpose, but if you feel you need more control, stick with a regular round brush.

2016-08-02FP-PurpleRobotStep02

Using your Diamond FX or Wolfe white, add some highlights, dots, and starbursts to add cohesion to the entire design.

2016-08-02FP-PurpleRobotStepFinalA-W

I hope you enjoyed today’s tutorial, and I’d love to see some of your robotic designs, so feel free to share them in the comments. Happy painting!

Beth MacKinney is the owner of and primary face painter for Face Paint Pizzazz in the NW Chicago suburbs. Stop by Clownantics.com for more of her face painting tutorials. If you’re on Facebook, join the Facepaint.com Challenge Group to showcase your artwork and have a chance to win a store credit for each week’s theme.


Share this post



← Older Post Newer Post →


Leave a comment